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Goodyear Police among first in Arizona to add electric motorcycle to fleet

Post Date:12/27/2019 10:06 AM

It’s quiet. It’s economical. And it just might be the future of law enforcement.

“It’s the newest thing for us, so we’re really excited,” said Goodyear Police Sergeant Jason Seabright about the city's new Zero DSR motorcycle. “In the couple times we’ve brought it out so far, the public really liked it and it gets a lot of attention.”

One of the first fully electric motorcycles used by law enforcement in Arizona, the Zero was awarded to Goodyear through a grant from the Arizona Governor’s Office of Highway Safety. It can go about 120 city miles and 90 highway miles on a single charge, enough for a typical police shift. It can be charged through a standard electrical outlet.

“Initially we were going to use it for special events – schools, parades, things like that. After speaking to some other agencies, we’re probably going to use it a little more for enforcement out on the road,” Seabright said.

The Zero comes with power hookups, which will allow police to plug in computers and use it for electronic citations. Goodyear PD plans to equip the bike with a radar unit, as well.

For Seabright, the biggest adjustment from the gas-powered motorcycles to the Zero is the noise – or lack thereof.

“It’s almost completely silent. Basically you only hear a little bit of whining from the electric motor, and the tire noise,” he said. “It is very different and will definitely take some getting used to if we’re switching between bikes.”

But the bike’s silence makes it ideal for covert activity – and it can also aid in search-and-rescue missions.

“If we’re trying to get into an area not noticed, we can definitely do that,” Seabright said. “It’s on-off road, so we can take it out in the desert. If there are any injured or lost hikers, missing people – anything like that, it’ll be great for that, as well.”

And with little maintenance required, the Zero is among the most cost-efficient vehicles in the entire Goodyear Police fleet.

“They’re about half as much as a regular gas motorcycle for police work, so it’s economical,” Seabrook said. “No oil changes, no gas fill-ups. We plug it in and it is good to go.”

Going forward, Seabright expects electric motorcycles to become more common among law enforcement – and it could lead to Goodyear Police adding more Zero power to the fleet in the future.

“I think they’re going to start getting more popular,” he said. “This is kind of a test one for us. We got it on a grant, so we’ll see how it goes.”